April 1, 2020

Quarantine Climate Reading List

By Joro

If you're anything like us, it’s about two weeks into quarantine, you finished streaming Tiger King, played Animal Crossing all weekend, baked through the flour in your pantry, and are starting to wonder if you had any other interests before all of this started.


Look no further. We decided to update our summer reading list with a handful of our favorite recent climate reads, watches, and listens for your quarantine content consumption. From 20 minutes to 200 pages, there's something on here for everyone. 


On the other side of this curve, we might just be in the best position ever to address the climate crisis. Get ready to learn, laugh, and impress all of your friends in a couple months when you see them again. 


Watch

  1. There’s Something in the Water [71 Minutes]

*environmental equity*


Ellen Page’s new documentary, There’s Something in the Water, was released on Netflix last week. It examines how pollution from large corporations disproportionately impacts the most vulnerable communities in Canada. The Hollywood Reporter described it as “an eye-opening experience, especially as it is set in country we tend to idealize for its wholesomeness.”


  1. Game Changers [112 minutes]



Ever wonder how vegetarians can maintain a healthy protein intake? In Game Changers, Ultimate Fighting Championship fighter James Wilks talks to athletes and experts at the top of their game as he explores the connection between a plant-forward diet and fitness. Spoiler: meat isn’t the only source of protein.


  1. The Future of Meat, explained [23 minutes]



This 23 minute Netflix episode highlights how the meat industry wreaks havoc on our planet and how companies like Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods are innovating the veggie burger. The future of meat might just be plants.


Listen


  1. HEATED Mini-Podcast on Climate + COVID-19




Emily Atkin started HEATED, a new newsletter, because she was pissed off about the climate crisis. Over the next 6 weeks, Atkin will release a podcast mini-series, interviewing experts to understand the relationship between coronavirus and global emissions. If her podcast is anything like her newsletter, you can expect hard-hitting journalism with a dose of heat.


  1. Greta’s #TALKSFORFUTURE

As the #Friday4Futures movement shelters in place for the foreseeable future, Greta Thunberg is teaming up with authors and experts on YouTube to host Friday Webinars dubbed #TALKSFORFUTURE. In the first webinar, Naomi Klein and Diarmind Campbell-Lendrum join to discuss the intersection of public health and the climate crisis.


  1. Politics 101 with Climate 2020


Climate 2020 wants to make climate change the #1 issue in the 2020 election. Get to know the candidates, their stance on climate, and bigger systemic issues like the connection between fossil fuels and coronavirus.


Read:


  1. We Are The Weather: Saving the Planet Begins at Breakfast



The science of the climate crisis is dire. Yet in his book, Jonathan Safran Foer outlines why collective action matters. And the good news is that we don’t have to leave our homes to start acting - we can start at breakfast.


  1. The Reducetarian [302 pages]


*essays * *plantforward* 


Transitioning to a plant-forward diet devoid of meat is tough- that’s why Bill Kateman coined the label Reducetarian, a person who deliberately reduces their meat intake to improve their carbon footprint. This brilliant collection of essays shares how reducing your meat meals, if only by 10%, can make a big impact for the planet.


  1. The Drawdown Review


In 2017, the New York Times best-selling book, Drawdown, fundamentally shifted the global conversation about climate change. It laid out 100 solutions to reverse the growth of greenhouse gas emissions, and showed that we can, in fact, address climate change with tools we have on hand today.


The new The Drawdown Review presents an updated, more complete view of climate action for the new decade, including a whole new framework to think about climate solutions.

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